Global Women

Branding is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything

Brandind_is_Sex-cover
Brandind_is_Sex-cover

If you hate making money and the feeling of a mind-blowing, toe curling orgasm—stay far away from Deb Gabor's new book.

In Branding is Sex: Get Your Customers Laid and Sell the Hell Out of Anything, the Sol Marketing founder and "brand dominatrix" explains how proper brand positioning gets your customers in the mood.

In just seven short and sweet chapters, Deb covers these juicy topics and more:

How the most successful brands in the world get their customers laid How to never fail The Bullshit Test Who your brand should hop in the sack with (and it’s not who you think)

Don’t rot in the brand graveyard like Blackberry, Oldsmobile, Circuit City, Compaq, Blockbuster Video, and Pets.com.

Get your sexy back and move from being “just friends” with your customers to being long-term “friends with benefits.”

Branding is Sex provides you with a concrete foundation and a basic how-to plan for building or re-igniting your brand without needing a PhD.

Buy your print or e-reader copy here, or read more about it at brandingissex.com

Part 3 of 3: Kerry Rupp and Sara Brand: Investing in positive purpose

Morning

Kerry Rupp and Sara Brand from True Wealth Ventures recently sat down with Sol Marketing to discuss their new fund, why women-led businesses are a great investment, and what they’re doing to make sure women-led businesses get the capital they need to grow. In this last of three posts, Rupp and Brand talk about why they're focusing on companies with a "positive purpose" and what they're obsessed with, and offer up words of wisdom for women entrepreneurs.

(Read parts one and two of this three-part interview)

What makes a for-profit company that is a positive purpose company different from a non-profit or a regular for-profit?

SB - The simple answer is that the positive purpose for-profit companies are looking to make money and grow their business model so that they can create significant financial returns. One of the things we have seen with women being investors is that high net worth women have made a lot of philanthropic ventures, but have not tended to invest in VC early stage asset classes. A lot of investors behind VCs have a similar gender profile. We see this as an opportunity as being an easier way for investors to try us out and know that their money will make a difference in the world, and that they will receive a significant ROI.

My view is that these for-profit, for-good companies look at creating a view of their stakeholders beyond just their shareholders. They think about the environment and having a greater impact in the world and they have the potential to move markets and change the world faster and in a bigger way than nonprofits.

KR – It’s starting to become a bit of a requirement for consumer products because millennials and women are building criteria about companies and how they behave when utilizing their decision process-- thinking about locally sourced, sustainably raised. Instead of thinking of it as you’re giving something up by giving so much to these other stakeholders, instead it can be what drives revenue streams and purchases because they are listening to their target market. The traditional view was that by taking into account certain stakeholders you are giving up some financial rewards, this is not true anymore. This can be how you win!

 

If you could go back in time and kick your younger self in the butt what would it be about and why?

SB - I got my PhD in Mechanical Engineering. I spent many hours doing these detailed things that I use zero of today. I would go back and tell myself just pass the exams. You don’t need to master this material that you will never use again.

KR - I’m going to take a bit of a cop-out answer, but I would say that I wouldn’t take any of my failures back. It is a part of the process and critical for learning. I feel like they were important in my development.

Besides your work with entrepreneurs and investors in the VC world, what are you obsessed with?

KR - I have been spending more time researching the health sector. Over the last few months I’ve been looking at inflammation and diseases and how epigenetics impacted these diseases. I started looking into what type of things people can do in a preventative way to stop these diseases from happening. I’m also looking into therapeutics in this space.

SB - I have a similar answer, so when you take that away I don’t have much to add. I have a son that was diagnosed with celiac. Because we owned a microbrewery, we ate a lot of bread products and all things gluten. I learned a lot about disorders like celiac. This opened my eyes as to what affects the things we eat are having on our bodies, especially in cases with autoimmune diseases. This is something I have been educating myself on and trying to learn more about.

Any parting words of wisdom for our women entrepreneur readers out there?

SB - Woman entrepreneurs need to know that there are so many opportunities out there for them, because they can bring a lot of value to the table for these startups that lack gender diversity. For woman investors, I think that what’s most inspiring is that today women hold 40% of the U.S investable assets and in the next 15 years that number is supposed to go up by 2/3. Women at the purchase point and their investments, they have the power to move markets. There is a lot of influence that women can have with their investments.

KR - From a marketer’s point of view, there was a process that got us to this place where we could focus on particular sectors and the gender lens. For people that are going through the process, talking to your customers and understanding your target market to identify your competitive advantage is something we all go through.

 

Part 2 of 3: Kerry Rupp and Sara Brand talk about why they focus their investments on women-led businesses

Kerry Rupp and Sara Brand from True Wealth Innovations recently sat down with Sol Marketing to discuss their new fund, why women-led businesses are a great investment, and what they’re doing to make sure women-led businesses get the capital they need to grow. In this second of three posts, Rupp and Brand talk about their "why."

(Read part one of this three-part interview here)

Why did you start this endeavor?

SB - Well the light bulb came on about a year and a half ago. I knew I wanted to get into venture capital somehow here in Austin. Austin is rated as the number-one startup city in the U.S., we have UT with their research and their new medical branch opening up. Over the last few years of education and career I was always around male-dominated environments. My husband and I started a microbrewery after I worked in the semiconductor industry.

All of these were very male-dominated. I was asked at the semiconductor job to become the executive sponsor of the Global Women’s Forum. After taking the position I read some studies and found that companies with more women in leadership positions performed better financially. At the same time, I was trying to figure out what my company could do about their numbers. Meanwhile I was trying to figure out my right move here in Austin. I realized that women were underrepresented and that I had never met a woman in VC here in Austin.

Of all VC partners, only four percent are women. Three percent of companies are women led, and those companies see 35% higher return utilizing a third less capital. We found a blind spot in the market without funds that are investing with this lens.

KR - When I ran DreamIt we started a DreamIt Athena for woman-run startups. Many times these people had trouble fundraising and/or they received comments from VCs that this market was just not a sector in which they invested. Then I met Sara and found out about her fund. I realized that we really had a significant gap in what the market offered today and what we could deliver.

 

What are some of the unique challenges and opportunities women face both on the investment side and as entrepreneurs, given this underrepresentation?

SB - Well, my mind went first to the disadvantages. What women have traditionally seen is that they are undercapitalized. They don’t have the same networks that most entrepreneurs use to get their companies off the ground. Or they are not willing to ask-- not thinking about it or willing to ask as men have typically done.

Also, as they start scaling the business, because of less capital they tend not to think as big or grow as quickly. Many woman-led businesses end up being undercapitalized and under scaled.

KR - Advantages are that with women making a lot of the purchasing decisions, we have a lot of the point of view around what marketing would resonate, what type of messaging should we use, etc. Because they understand the customer better, this can be an advantage.

SB - That reminds me of another study I read. When entrepreneurs created a product or service based on a particular need they have, they were significantly more successful. Women tend to be the largest percent of that category. The advantage women have here is that there have been a lot fewer leaders at companies addressing the certain needs that women have historically had a better understanding of.

 

Are you getting traction with this? What do you see coming short- and long-term?

KR - These numbers really resonate with people. When you quote the statistics on the performance of women-led companies, people gasp and it really opens their eyes. They realize there is a gap here. The health and sustainability sectors are particularly popular here in Austin, and we are already seeing many startups in these sectors here in Austin being led by women. Although we focus on Texas as a whole, it’s great that we have these types of organizations right in our back yard.

SB - As more women invest and millennials can invest more significant sums of money, this is an area that really resonates with them. Seventy-three percent of millennial women not only want a great financial return, but also to invest in areas that have a positive impact in the world. There are similar numbers for investors that want to invest in more gender diversity.

 

Watch this space for part three.